The recent death of Frank Faulkner

February 26, 2013 at 12:44 am (Angoram Club, Frank Faulkner, Papua New Guinea, Sepik River)

Kevin Trueman, Mary Shirley, Wayne Heathcote, Robyn and Frank Faulkner, Angoram Club, late 1960s

Kevin Trueman, Mary Shirley, Wayne Heathcote, Robyn and Frank Faulkner, Angoram Club, late 1960s

(Photo provided by Ella Lucas)

 

It is sad, Frank was a really nice bloke, very unruffled, very easy going, very modest.   Also kind to younger  kiaps !        Peter Johnson

Frank, was a congenial, good-natured man and an excellent kiap! It is indeed sad to hear about his death.      David Wall

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Frank FAULKNER (22nd December 2012 aged 75 years)

Frank first went to Papuan New Guinea in 1957 as a cadet patrol officer. He
was initially assigned to the Milne Bay District with later postings to the

Madang Sepik, and Central Districts. He finally left the service in 1975 with
the rank of District Officer.
In subsequent years Frank returned to Papua New Guinea and worked in
community liaison roles for mining companies at Lihir and Porgera. He was
also latterly employed as a camp manager by Oilmin Field Services Pty Ltd
which serviced international petroleum exploration companies operating in
the Southern Highlands and Gulf Provinces.

In betwixt field assignments Frank liked to frequent the ski resorts in Colorado
and Europe, or scuba dive in the Mediterranean and the Bahamas.

In retirement Frank resided in Angeles City in the Philippines.

Frank Faulkner was a genial, well informed and interesting person. He will be
missed by his many friends.

Harry Redmond

Source: Una Voce 2013,No 1 – March

 

 

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Norm Liddle, an engaging and likeable character!

February 23, 2013 at 5:31 am (Angoram, Angoram Club, Biography, East Sepik District, East Sepik Province, Kainantu, Mining, Norm Liddle, PNG, Sepik River)

The remains of Norm Liddle's saw mill in Angoram

The remains of Norm Liddle’s saw mill in Angoram

In the course of our lives we all meet a number of people – some readily forgettable and others we might just remember. But there are a select few we can never forget. In this category I would put Norm Liddle!

Norm was that type of Australian, particularly a Queenslander, who I’m afraid to say are now pretty thin on the ground – a man with a wide and varied experience of life and readily adaptable to whatever circumstances he found himself in – whether it was the Australian outback, cutting timber, fixing machinery, serving in the RAAF and the AIF, and living along the Sepik River and the Highlands of PNG; he took it all in his stride. Truly a character!

I first met Norm in 1966 in Angoram. At this time he was living in what was known as the Ex-Service Camp in the far extremities of the town boundaries on the banks of the river. It was there that he had the beginnings of a saw mill.

He arrived in Angoram in 1963. His first interest was to ascertain the timber potential in areas near the Keram River. His junior partner in business at the time was Jeff Liversidge – a man who is still living in Wewak, and is well-known as a sculptor.

A friend of mine once described Norm: ‘as an accomplished musician, skilled taxidermist, reptile hunter, ex-serviceman in both the army and the air force, and pioneer forestry surveyor.’

I well remember Norm in the Angoram Club giving us a rendition on his accordion of Rolf Harris’s The Court of King Caractacus. I must also admit, that on some rare occasions the members hoped that Norm would be like the ladies of the harem of the Court of King Caractacus and just pass by! But seriously we all enjoyed his playing.

Norm was a man that could and would speak with authority on most subjects. In many ways he had an encyclopaedic mind – his facts were not always correct, but in discussions he had few equals. On one occasion he engaged a Spanish speaker in the correct pronunciation of the word, President – Norm insisted that it was El Presidento, the Spanish speaker said it was, El Presidente – I’m afraid the Spanish speaker was correct!

Norm fitted in with the prevailing atmosphere, and the life of Angoram. Some who were less than friendly towards him may have described him as bone lazy. But all credit to Norm, he did survive, even if at times he may have appeared to be only subsisting!

He would make himself available to the odd tourist around the town, and this brought in the odd dollar. One young American woman whom Norm had helped with arranging transport and hiring canoes, showed her gratitude by sending him a packet of marijuana seeds from the States. This was at a time when New Guinea was blissfully ignorant about the drug. Norm planted the seeds near his setup on the river bank and they grew like wildfire. Some said that for a year or so Norm kept himself pretty well stoned! I was told that he was careful not to let the locals know anything about the plant and what it was doing for him.

Norm was a great advocate for a number of local people in the courts, and was instrumental in getting many off after representing and giving legal advice to them – indeed a man of many parts!

His interesting and varied life came to an end in Kainantu in 1986. It was there that, I believe, he thought he was onto a sure thing having found a gold mine that he figured would yield great returns.

Sometime prior to this his personal life took a very happy turn for the better. He met Monika, a woman from Kambaramba, and they became partners. Monika subsequently gave birth to Vivian, their daughter. Norm by all reports was so proud of Vivian.

What else can I say about Norm, he was a character, but a very likeable one, a human man with more virtues than vices!

See: https://deberigny.wordpress.com/2008/09/08/komuniti-monthly-newsletter-angoram-community-centre/

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‘Sepik Blu Longpela Muruk’ shortly available on Amazon’s Kindle Direct!

February 22, 2013 at 11:33 pm (Fiction, Papua New Guinea)

A treat in store for my many readers!

http://www.amazon.com/SEPIK-BLU-LONGPELA-MURUK-ebook/dp/B00BJKTFEM/ref=la_B00BJRQVN8_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1361584393&sr=1-1

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An old piece on my blog that might be of interest!

February 21, 2013 at 10:22 am (Corruption in PNG, Papua New Guinea, Peter O'Neill)

https://deberigny.wordpress.com/png-on-brink-of-ruin-as-government-hangs-in-the-balance-by-allan-patience/

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Photos from recent PNG visit

February 16, 2013 at 5:07 am (Angoram, East Sepik Province, Wewak)

Ralf Stuttgen

Ralf Stuttgen

Wewak rubbish

Wewak rubbish

Eyesore as you drive into Wewek!

Eyesore as you drive into Wewek!

Beirney Ambroic & Otto(PMV driver & assistant)

Beirney Ambroic & Otto
(PMV driver & assistant)

Tang Mow frozen goods

Tang Mow frozen goods

Wewak main St

Wewak main St

Sir Hugo

Sir Hugo

Rhonda

Rhonda

On the way to Angoram

On the way to Angoram

Joseph

Joseph

Thomas Arop

Thomas Arop

Church at Boram

Church at Boram

Rubbish

Rubbish

Daniel Gurem

Daniel Gurem

Angoram Market

Angoram Market

Mongniol Primary Schoo

Mongniol Primary School

Dave & Councillor Sengi

Dave & Councillor Sengi

Rubbish dump, Wewak

Rubbish dump, Wewak

Raphael Maimba

Raphael Maimba

John Talai & family

John Talai & family

Peter & Brandon Johnson

Peter & Brandon Johnson

Peter Ettu,Dave Wall,Peter Sap

Peter Ettu,Dave Wall,Peter Sap

Sanam Kabasse & Dave Wall

Sanam Kabasse & Dave Wall

Peter Johnson & Ralf Stuttgen

Peter Johnson & Ralf Stuttgen

Conrad Jamb & X-Ray staff, Wewak Hospital

Conrad Jamb & X-Ray staff, Wewak Hospital

Wewak Hospital

Wewak Hospital

Wewak Hospital

Wewak Hospital

Tang Mow Store

Tang Mow Store

Litter around Wewak 1

Litter around Wewak 1

Litter 2

Litter 2

Litter 3

Litter 3

Wewak

Wewak

School near Wewak rubbish dump

School near Wewak rubbish dump

Jim Pasquarelli

Jim Pasquarelli

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Last Tuesday I returned from PNG!

February 4, 2013 at 5:50 am (Angoram, East Sepik Province, PNG Health, Wewak)

Sorry state of Wewak

The National, 30/01/2013                                     Perhaps Gabriel Fito’s description of me as a veteran doctor is over generous!

Stories and pictures will be shortly posted, but for the present I’m suffering from the deadly kus!

I’ve just returned from a month in the Sepik. My many friends there realise what a terrible mess the country is in! The common call I heard in Angoram was, expressed in various Pidgin phrases, but all meaning that the country has gone to the dogs,and when is Australia coming back?

The greatest disservice Australia did to PNG was granting independence in 1975.

Matthias Toliman, Tei Abal, Pita Simogen, and Michael Somare’s father, Ludwig, could all say from the grave, ‘we told you so!’

When I get over the kus mi kisim, I want to write about what the Sepiks really think about the so-called colonial time, and their present ‘elites’, who have largely presided over the demise of government services, and enriched themselves and their families – they can go overseas for medical treatment and educate their children in prestigious institutions abroad.

It’s about time Australia recognises the near chaos in its neighbour, and forget about places like Afghanistan!

Excuse me for going on,and my comment might be immaterial as appropriate to Anthony Radford’s book, but the colonial period compared with the present PNG situation was utopian!

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