“A novel and a biography: Two new books by David Wall”

December 15, 2013 at 6:43 am (Angoram Club, artifacts, Book review, Commentary, David Wall, expatriates, Fiction, Jim Wall, Jim Wall An Australian Life, Papua New Guinea, Sepik Blu Longpela Muruk)

See:   http://asopa.typepad.com/asopa_people/2013/08/a-novel-and-a-biography-two-new-books-by-david-wall.html

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Photographic memories

November 30, 2013 at 11:41 pm (Angoram, artifacts, Bob Mackie, Commentary, Deborah Ruiz Wall, Don Bosgard, Dr Jan J Saave, East Sepik District, expatriates, Fr Fons Ruijter, Goya Henry, H.B.G. Larkin, Jim McKinnon, John Bowers, Kami Raymundus, Kevin Trueman, Michael Somare, Papua New Guinea, Paul Dennett, Peter Johnson, Photos, Sepik floods, Somare, Temlett Conibeer, W.M. Hughes)

Don Pybus in Sydney

Don Pybus in Sydney

 

Dieter with Peter Johnson, Sepik Ironman Competition, 07/06/2009

Dieter with Peter Johnson, Sepik Ironman Competition, 07/06/2009

Greetings from Goya 1968

Greetings from Goya 1968

A.C.T. Marke & John Kelly in the wilds of PNG

A.C.T. Marke & John Kelly in the wilds of PNG

1958 Leeton, contemplates a world trip  1961 Troppo on Kar Kar Island  1963 Driekikir

1958 Leeton, contemplates a world trip 1961 Troppo on Kar Kar Island 1963 Driekikir

Bill Eichhorn, MBE » Bill Eichhorn, successful entrepreneur and politician at home on the Keram River

Bill Eichhorn, successful entrepreneur and politician at home on the Keram River

Dave Wall at Kekten Village

Dave Wall at Kekten Village

William & Rosa Batak, Kekten Village

William & Rosa Batak, Kekten Village

png-7achief-minister-somare-angoram-1973

Ralf Stüttgen

Ralf Stüttgen

Sago 3   Sago 2   Sago Memories, thanks to Bob Beeke   Jock   Bob Beeke   Angoram Hotel

 d-d1Floods

kami,Torembi Village

kami,Torembi Village

Dave Wall & Jan Saave, some years after they left PNG

Dave Wall & Jan Saave, some years after they left PNG

Sue Treutlein & Bob Mackie at the Angoram Club

Sue Treutlein & Bob Mackie at the Angoram Club

Sanam Kabasse & Dave Wall

Sanam Kabasse & Dave Wall

Wewak Hospital

Wewak Hospital

Hand-written letter from W.M. Hughes to H.B.G. Larkin 2

Michael Somare, Angoram, 1973

Graeme Jones, Robyn Faulkner, Co-op Manager, Dave Bretherton, Jan Matysek, Clare & Des Hill, Bruce Ross, Pat Bretherton, Ella Lucas, Ronnie Lucas

Graeme Jones, Robyn Faulkner, Co-op Manager, Dave Bretherton, Jan Matysek, Clare & Des Hill, Bruce Ross, Pat Bretherton, Ella Lucas, Ronnie Lucas

outside the church 2

On the left, Eva Waramapi

On the left, Eva Waramapi

treutlein-xmas-party-sue-kev-babypng-6a2peter-johnson-mha

  1960sAngoram 1960s

The Rev. John Spender

The Rev. John Spender

David Augustus Wall & John Bowers in Como, early 1980s

David Augustus Wall & John Bowers in Como, early 1980s

Cedric Wyatt, Rick Wyatt, CWyatt - a legend in his own time!

Cedric Wyatt, Rick Wyatt, CWyatt – a legend in his own time!

Bob Becke with May & Harry Marchant, Two called to the bar at the Angoram Club, Jim McKinnon, Esther & Jim Stevens

Bob Becke with May & Harry Marchant, Two called to the bar at the Angoram Club, Jim McKinnon, Esther & Jim Stevens

Jock McIntyre & Bob Becke, Western District, PNG, 1960

Jock McIntyre & Bob Becke, Western District, PNG, 1960

Angoram Hotel Sepik.  Houseboat and powered canoes for guided tours along the mighty Sepik River. Angoram, Sepik District, New Guinea Photo Uwe Steinward (C) GNG 70

Angoram Hotel Sepik. Houseboat and powered canoes for guided tours along the mighty Sepik River. Angoram, Sepik District, New Guinea Photo Uwe Steinward (C) GNG 70

png3bnew-shots-224new-shots-208paul-david-danAngoram 1960s

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The sudden death of Kevin Trueman in Port Vila

June 9, 2013 at 6:03 am (Angoram Club, artifacts, East Sepik District, expatriates, Funerals, Kevin Trueman, Papua New Guinea, Sepik River)

Kevin Trueman on the left, late 1960s in the Angoram Club

Kevin Trueman on the left, late 1960s, in the Angoram Club

See: http://asopa.typepad.com/asopa_people/2013/09/tribute-to-kevin-trueman-a-real-islands-entrepreneur.html#comments

For those who knew Kevin or knew of him, the news of his sudden death on the night of 7th June, would be received with much sadness.

We all extend to Evelyn, his wife, and family, the deepest condolences!

Readers of this blog are invited to write of their recollections of Kevin.

Some have sent me emails which I’ve taken the liberity of reproducing here in part.

Kevin in anyone’s book was an extraordinary character – once known never forgotten!

Vale Kevin Trueman

Robin Hodgson
12:08 PM (1 hour ago)
to me

Hello Dave and Debbie,

Richard just rang to say that Kevin died suddenly in Port Vila last night after feeling unwell at dinner.  Evelyn is apparently in Australia. Eunice Hanson advised.

Rob & Meg
Jun 8 (1 day ago)
to me, origin.wewak

Thanks for that David.He certainly lived life to the full.

I remember when he was in charge of Sepik Coffee.

Another Sepik character that is for sure.

Kind regards,Rob.

Alan Pretty
11:29 PM (15 hours ago)
to me

Quite a shock & sad to hear. I always had a good relationship with him & remember him fondly.

I remember the last time I saw him. Remy & I had a meal with him & Evelyn in his house in Cremorne (I think – one of those North shore suburbs). It was a splendid evening, some 30 years ago…

He led an amazing life – Vale Kev indeed…

LeighPerry
6:29 AM (8 hours ago)
to Don, me

Damn, another man down. Kevin was always larger than his life. A big man with a big heart. He had a good eye for artifacts, too.

Do you have an email address or mailing address for Evelyn?

Maybe in a way he was lucky, like Dieter, dying at the end of a day in a place and time that suited him.

Thanks so much for keeping all of us in touch, even for sad news. Carolyn

Carolyn Leigh Studios

via iPhone

From:

Sandra
To Evelyn

SANDY KING FROM THE OLD DAYS IN ANGORAM.

SO SORRY TO HEAR ABOUT THE DEATH OF KEVIN.

GEOFF AND I REMEMBER ALL THE FUNNY, HAPPY AND ADVENTUROUS TIMES WE

HAD WITH YOURSELF AND BIG KEV.

A WARM EMBRACE GOES OUT TO YOU AND YOURS.

KINDEST REGARDS

SANDRA HOUGH AND GEOFF KING

Sandra
12:37 PM (2 hours ago)
to me

………………..KEVIN WAS A CROCODILE HUNTER AND TRADER
OF CROC SKINS.

HE WAS FUNDED BY ARSHAK, CONSEQUENTLY GEOFF AND I WERE HANDING OUT THE PURCHASE
MONIES TO BOTH HE AND RIVAL RUDI TREUTLEIN.

I ONLY HAVE AFFECTIONATE RECOLLECTIONS OF THE OUTGOING KEV AND PATIENT SUPPORTIVE
EVELYN.

Sandra
Jun 8 (1 day ago)
to me

OH DEAR…………….BETTER GET THAT REUNION GOING BEFORE WE ALL FALL OFF THE PERCH.
REMEMBERED WITH AFFECTION.

At this stage we do not have an email address for Evelyn.

I encourage those who knew Kevin to make comments.

See: http://www.dailypost.vu/content/kevin-trueman-loveable-larrikin-who-lived-life-fullest

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SP DOES ITS BIT OF NATION BUILDING!

October 15, 2012 at 12:51 pm (artifacts, Commentary, Papua New Guinea, PNG Health)

Brewery unveils new label

One approving resident of PNG wrote thus to me:

“This bit of shattering news appeared recently in The National, but it was of such major import that both papers made mention.   Are you going to second my Nobel nomination?

” I knew we could have confidence in the new government; just look at the attached, this will do wonders for the nation, what an advance…Nobel Peace Prize for the innovative Mr. Harwood!”

Since the introduction of country-wide drinking in PNG in 1962 the wonders of alcohol have been an ever-present feature of the nation!

Should we congratulate the SP Company for the nation-building potential of every greenie can & brownie bottle of their fine amber fluid?

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The call of the river

September 21, 2010 at 7:11 am (Angoram, artifacts, David Wall, Deborah Ruiz Wall, Papua New Guinea) (, , , , , , , , , )

This photo has a bit of history about it. In 1969 a group of Japanese academics from Kyoto City University visited the Sepik, and stayed for a number of weeks in Angoram, collecting artefacts and even some human skulls – a Sepik art form. They did linguistic and anthropological studies in the area.

The leader of the group was a professor of English and a veteran of the Japanese campaign in China during WW II – a charming and distinguished gentleman. There were two other young men who were associate professors and a beautiful young woman – an anthropologist.

They all had an extraordinary capacity for Johnnie Walker Black Label Whisky, which we all consumed in a convivial atmosphere of discussions with no language problems. I have the names of each member of the visiting party in a trunk somewhere or other in my attic.

Back to the subject of the photo. This was taken by one of the Japanese from a river boat that they were travelling on – on their way to Pagwai and hence to Maprik. I was also on my way upriver on a patrol in a canoe – from memory, to the Middle Sepik. The photographer called out to me after taking the picture –  “Come to Kyoto, David,  it’s your city!”

So much for the international flavour of the old Angoram.

Oh, yes, this is the first photo my wife, Deborah, saw of me, so it must have something about it!!

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C Wyatt, a legend in his own time, makes a visit.

September 10, 2010 at 1:36 am (Angoram, artifacts, expatriates, Papua New Guinea, PNG) (, , , , , , , , , , , )

Cedric Wyatt, Rick Wyatt, CWyatt - a legend in his own time!

What a pleasure it was to see Rick after many years – an old expat Sepik hand – Education Officer, Cultural Development Officer and extraordinary character.

We spoke of many things and people – kiap(s), ol didiman, teachers,  missionaries, politicians, medical officers, medical assistants, malaria control officers, doktaboi(s), ol meri na misis, ol  mankimasta, traders, artefact buyers, educators, crocodile shooters, recruiters, the God fearing and the not so God fearing, canoes and the present state of PNG. These are just a glimpse of the depth of our discussions.

We were both intrigued with a rumour going around Angoram that the late Patoman, a mankimasta/butler, who had served many expats in the past, did leave a memoir, dictated to a tourist and written down in the 1980s just before he died. This manuscript, if it exists, would be a priceless document for a social historian researching the Sepik.

In life it’s a wonderful thing to catch up with old friends, especially ones of the calibre of Rick.

(To the locals Rick was mainly known as CWyatt, particularly in Kaup, a coastal village where he spent a considerable time as a teacher.)

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Priceless Korewori piece from the Caves

December 11, 2009 at 2:48 am (Angoram, artifacts, Papua New Guinea) (, , , , , )

Donald Bosgard & David Wall with ‘the priceless piece’, Angoram, 1969

 

A distinctive piece much admired by Thomas Murry Slimmon, a distinguished artefact collector and dealer from Angoram in the 1960s.

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A fortune so tantalizingly close

October 21, 2009 at 4:30 am (Angoram, artifacts, expatriates, Fiction, Short Story) (, , , , , , , , , )

Sam Bell sat on the verandah of his house in Angoram on Tobacco Road facing the Sepik River and he contemplated the future and the past. He had reason to be reflective as he was, just now, recovering from a rather virulent dose of clap thanks to the penicillin injections given by Jamie Ward, but life went on, and a man had to make a bob and the future offered interesting possibilities in this respect.

Angoram in the 1960s had its fair share of dreamers and schemers with little to sustain them but the hope of better things to come. Sam, who arrived in New Guinea shortly after the Second World War had put his hand to most things from Airways employee to gold mining and trading but never had he been so hopeful of making a fortune than he was just now.

When he first arrived in Angoram he could see that there was money in running a trade store and in buying crocodile skins, and with his partner, Bill Clayton, a pretty penny had been made. But Sam wanted big money and the events of the last couple of days held out the prospect of this.

A couple of weeks previously Sam had sent Carlos Ruiz, a mixed-race employee, to the Amboin area up the Karawari River to check out the kwila or ironwood stands. In this endeavour, his information was of little value. All he could really say was that he had seen the occasional kwila and that the people would cut them down and float them down the river to Angoram, but they wanted axes, saws and an outboard motor to do this as well as an exorbitant amount of money for each tree.

Sam thought to himself that Carlos was a bit of a useless bastard, he’d been up the river on good wages and this is all he can come back with. He knew that he was a bit of a piss-pot and he had become more so after some of those do-gooders had allowed him to become a member of the Angoram Club, as Sam said: “A man’s got to work with them I can’t see any reason why you have to relax with them.” These words of precaution were offered in the soft tones of Sam’s Scottish brogue and became more meaningful in observing the expressive Hemingway look-alike face of his.

But then life is full of surprises, for the good Carlos went on to reveal and show Sam something of earth-shattering importance. Sam, an inveterate art fancier, was all ears after Carlos showed him a piece of woodcarving he had collected while in the upper reaches of the Karawari River.

Carlos could detect that Sam was not too impressed with what he had to tell him about the timber and its availability. As an afterthought he said: “Sam, I did get as far up the river as Inyai, ol yangpela there kept on talking about some caves they wanted to show me. I could tell that the old blokes were not too keen to show me where these caves were. This made me think that there might be something good to see there. Well, I did go to the caves and all I saw was a whole lot of old junky carvings. I bought this one for $10 from the young blokes. A bit of rubbish as far as I’m concerned but I thought you might be interested.”

To say that Sam might be interested was the understatement of the century. What Carlos produced was a wooden carved female figure standing at about 5 1/2 feet and made, as far as Sam could tell, from ironwood. The figure was in the frontal position with upraised arms and the head was crowned with a spiked elevated adornment. Sam, who had been collecting on the river for years, had never seen anything quite like it. It appeared to be very old with an indefinable quality about it.

An appreciation of so called primitive art is an intangible quality that grows on some expatriates without them necessarily being very knowledgeable about the culture that produces such art. What is the difference between a curio and a piece of carving that radiates and gleams to the aware? Sam knew, but could probably not give you an answer. In his years on the Sepik River, Sam had seen piles of good and bad carvings and he had a very good idea what was an artifact and what was just fairly good carving. He had no doubt that what he was looking at now was important aesthetically and financially. Or in Sam’s terminology, “there’s a bob to be made here.”

He knew he had to conceal and disguise from Carlos how impressed he was with the carving. Otherwise, the whole town would hear about it and what was left in the Karawari would be collected by others. He thought to himself, “that bloody Pietro will be up there like a shot and as for that German doctor this would be just the excuse he needs to go on a medical patrol up the river and get as many carvings as he can.” John Pietro was a trader very often in competition with Sam for a good carving. Jan Speer, the German doctor, Sam accused him of building up his own museum and selling artefacts in Europe, all at government expense by collecting on so- called medical patrols.

If there were more like this piece, Sam thought to himself, then I’ve struck it. He could talk of gold, heavy yellow gold. Of course, the very thing he intended not to do was talk about it. He would imply to Bill Clayton, his business partner that he was on a good thing.

“OK Carlos here’s the $10 for this piece and what you’ve found out about timber in the Karawari could be useful. I think I might check it out for myself in the next few days.” He got the carving back to his house pronto, and got his houseboy to brew a very strong pot of coffee. While drinking, he reflected, and tried to suppress his excitement and he decided to share and show Bill Clayton the carving. After all, Bill and I are partners, he figured. But the truth was that he couldn’t help but tell someone of what he considered his good fortune.

Bill when he saw the piece was equally blown away by it. Together they made plans to get up the Karawari River as soon as possible. “We’ll not take that blabbermouth, Carlos, with us.” The lure of gold was now firmly planted in Sam’s psyche and he saw his El Dorado on the horizon. “Bill, we’ve got to get to those caves as soon as possible.”

Sam and Bill made to the caves. Up the Karawari past Amboin to the headwaters of the Arfundi River to Inyai and Awim village territory and beyond to limestone escarpments, where caves were discovered full of the most extraordinary artifacts. Sam nearly had a heart attack on the trip as the going was so hard; tramping through swamps and bush tracks to finally reach the treasure.

The pieces consisted of hooks in a complex style and female figures like the one that Carlos had shown Sam. Sam managed to persuade the locals to sell ten pieces to them and they were up and out of there as soon as they could leave. When they arrived back in Angoram Sam had no trouble getting an export permit from the Assistant District Commissioner.

He decided he would send them off to a contact he had in the Museum of Primitive Art in New York, merely to get them priced. This is what was done but alas, alas, they never got to New York. According to Sam, “some rotten bastard in Madang nicked the lot of them.” For years after Sam and Bill scanned museum catalogues and displays and talked to private collectors, but had no success in tracing their pieces. All that Sam knew was that similar pieces had come on the market and were conservatively priced in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Sam and other collectors did subsequently collect from the caves much to their personal profit. But the ones that were taken were always a source of grief to Sam.

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Free online copy of Sepik Blu Longpela Muruk!

December 28, 2008 at 11:21 pm (Angoram, artifacts, expatriates, Fiction, malaria control, Papua New Guinea) (, , , , , , , , , , , )

A critique that is a fair measure of the book.

Just send me your email address in ‘comment’ and I’ll send you an online copy. The link to the online copy:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/10049376/Sepik-Blu-Longpela-Muruk

For $2 you can get the book from Amazon Kindle Direct:http://www.amazon.com/kindle/dp/B00BJKTFEM/ref=rdr_kindle_ext_eos_detail

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