The sudden death of Kevin Trueman in Port Vila

June 9, 2013 at 6:03 am (Angoram Club, artifacts, East Sepik District, expatriates, Funerals, Kevin Trueman, Papua New Guinea, Sepik River)

Kevin Trueman on the left, late 1960s in the Angoram Club

Kevin Trueman on the left, late 1960s, in the Angoram Club

See: http://asopa.typepad.com/asopa_people/2013/09/tribute-to-kevin-trueman-a-real-islands-entrepreneur.html#comments

For those who knew Kevin or knew of him, the news of his sudden death on the night of 7th June, would be received with much sadness.

We all extend to Evelyn, his wife, and family, the deepest condolences!

Readers of this blog are invited to write of their recollections of Kevin.

Some have sent me emails which I’ve taken the liberity of reproducing here in part.

Kevin in anyone’s book was an extraordinary character – once known never forgotten!

Vale Kevin Trueman

Robin Hodgson
12:08 PM (1 hour ago)
to me

Hello Dave and Debbie,

Richard just rang to say that Kevin died suddenly in Port Vila last night after feeling unwell at dinner.  Evelyn is apparently in Australia. Eunice Hanson advised.

Rob & Meg
Jun 8 (1 day ago)
to me, origin.wewak

Thanks for that David.He certainly lived life to the full.

I remember when he was in charge of Sepik Coffee.

Another Sepik character that is for sure.

Kind regards,Rob.

Alan Pretty
11:29 PM (15 hours ago)
to me

Quite a shock & sad to hear. I always had a good relationship with him & remember him fondly.

I remember the last time I saw him. Remy & I had a meal with him & Evelyn in his house in Cremorne (I think – one of those North shore suburbs). It was a splendid evening, some 30 years ago…

He led an amazing life – Vale Kev indeed…

LeighPerry
6:29 AM (8 hours ago)
to Don, me

Damn, another man down. Kevin was always larger than his life. A big man with a big heart. He had a good eye for artifacts, too.

Do you have an email address or mailing address for Evelyn?

Maybe in a way he was lucky, like Dieter, dying at the end of a day in a place and time that suited him.

Thanks so much for keeping all of us in touch, even for sad news. Carolyn

Carolyn Leigh Studios

via iPhone

From:

Sandra
To Evelyn

SANDY KING FROM THE OLD DAYS IN ANGORAM.

SO SORRY TO HEAR ABOUT THE DEATH OF KEVIN.

GEOFF AND I REMEMBER ALL THE FUNNY, HAPPY AND ADVENTUROUS TIMES WE

HAD WITH YOURSELF AND BIG KEV.

A WARM EMBRACE GOES OUT TO YOU AND YOURS.

KINDEST REGARDS

SANDRA HOUGH AND GEOFF KING

Sandra
12:37 PM (2 hours ago)
to me

………………..KEVIN WAS A CROCODILE HUNTER AND TRADER
OF CROC SKINS.

HE WAS FUNDED BY ARSHAK, CONSEQUENTLY GEOFF AND I WERE HANDING OUT THE PURCHASE
MONIES TO BOTH HE AND RIVAL RUDI TREUTLEIN.

I ONLY HAVE AFFECTIONATE RECOLLECTIONS OF THE OUTGOING KEV AND PATIENT SUPPORTIVE
EVELYN.

Sandra
Jun 8 (1 day ago)
to me

OH DEAR…………….BETTER GET THAT REUNION GOING BEFORE WE ALL FALL OFF THE PERCH.
REMEMBERED WITH AFFECTION.

At this stage we do not have an email address for Evelyn.

I encourage those who knew Kevin to make comments.

See: http://www.dailypost.vu/content/kevin-trueman-loveable-larrikin-who-lived-life-fullest

Permalink 16 Comments

William (Bill) Peace 1913-2011

March 23, 2013 at 12:56 am (A.C.T. Marke, Anglican Church in PNG, Biography, Commentary, expatriates, Fiction, Funerals, Love in a hot climate, Papua New Guinea, Temlett Conibeer)

Bill Peace comments, March 25, 2010

 

When Bill sent me his remarks about A.C.T. Marke’s novel: LOVE IN A HOT CLIMATE, he told me he had written them rather hurriedly, and he requested that I proofread them – this I didn’t do!

In the above link I have now attempted to do this.

Unfortunately, Bill died in the following year, and in his memory, I would like to record the following:

On the 14th of June, 2011, Bill died of a massive heart attack at his home in Wagga Wagga. His funeral and burial service were conducted by the Rev’d Septimus Foreman at St John’s Anglican Church, Wagga, on 17th of June, according to the full burial rites of the Book of Common Prayer. This would have pleased Bill very much as he was a dedicated Prayer Book man!

The assembled mourners were inspired by the reading of Psalm 23 in the King James Version: “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.”

In a tribute to Bill, David A. de B. Wall spoke glowingly of his many years of service with the Department of Treasury, in Papua New Guinea.

A short message, of love and condolences, was read out from Bill’s partner of many years, Sakura Mori, known endearingly to Bill as ‘Moonface’. Sakura expressed her deep sorrow that she was unable to attend the funeral because of her failing health, and the travel difficulties entailed on a journey from her home in Osaka.

From the church the funeral procession moved to the War Cemetery for the burial. At the graveside a member of the local RSL spoke of Bill’s war service, and he was honoured with the playing of the last post.

The Rev’d Septimus Foreman then committed Bill’s body to the grave while reading from the Prayer Book:

“… we therefore committe hys bodye to the grounde, earthe, to earthe, ashes, to ashes, dust to dust, in sure, and certein hope of resurrection…”

This day marked the passing of an esteemed Australian and PNG expatriate.

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“The Return of the Native” (Apologies to Thomas Hardy!)

December 23, 2012 at 7:06 am (Angoram, Commentary, Funerals, PNG, Sepik River, Wewak)

 

Dave Wall 001

 

Not quite The Return of the Native, but something of it, anyhow!

On the 29th of this month I hope to be in Wewak – staying in the Sepik for a month. Maybe a trip to Angoram to catch up with old friends.

If I should croak while there, I’ve left instructions that I’m to be buried in the nearest matmat – no involved movement  of remains!

I hope this trip will be a rich source of information that will inspire me to write better, and improve the usual 2nd rate stuff that I put on this blog!

To all my readers, wherever you are, all the best for Christmas and the New Year!

David Wall

Permalink 2 Comments

Funerals and reconciliation

January 13, 2012 at 9:31 am (Commentary, Funerals)

I suspect in many societies a funeral is a time for families, friends and even enemies to get together and mourn the passing of someone. From the little bit I know about Australian Aboriginals and Filipinos, the concept of a funeral and reconciliation is a strong motivating factor that brings people together, whether they be friends or enemies, at the time of another’s death.

Some funerals don’t always attract such general agreement, and the attendance of all interested parties is by no means always guaranteed.

A friend of mine, Tom, in my old PNG days, often said about people who had died whom he didn’t like: “as far as I’m concerned, he was a bastard when he was alive and he’s a bastard now he’s dead.” Tom certainly didn’t agree with the idea that you should never speak ill of the dead, but he being a pragmatic Scot probably explained his down-to-earth attitude.

In our country funerals are public events, not only  the invited may attend, but anyone else may come along. Of course, genuine mourners of a departed loved one are entitled to be concerned about who actually attends. The eulogies can be a point of concern. For the most part, those who speak at funerals carry the idea of never speaking ill of the dead to extremes, and what they say becomes mere platitudes, full of motherhood statements. My idea at a funeral is to send off the departed in a blaze of glory and truth, not necessarily by tipping a bucket on anyone unless it’s well and truly deserved.

Tom Hughes QC in his eulogy at the state memorial service for John Gorton certainly spoke well of the dead, but he gave a serve to the living in the person of Malcolm Fraser, and I think he was entitled to say what he thought, in the interests of the dead Gorton, for he came to praise Gorton and to bury him.

All of this reminds me of a rather little ludicrous series of events that came to my notice recently. A person, be he nameless, had a sister, from whom he had been estranged  for many years, and this sister’s husband died. In the interests of some real concern and reconciliation the said individual rang his sister to offer his condolences. You might be tempted to applaud him for this, but as things worked out, it would appear his sister didn’t take too kindly to his overture. Some days after a brother rang him questioning if he intended to go to the funeral, and make a speech, and informing him, that his sister and a niece were most concerned about this, and in so many words telling him to stay away. This, for him, only added insult to injury as he had no intention, given the feeling he knew his sister had for him, of going to the funeral. It should be stated here, that he did have a reputation for making quite notable and forthright eulogies at family funerals. It all goes to prove that funerals, families, and reconciliation don’t always go together.

Perhaps we should all follow the good book and:”Let the dead bury their dead.”

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